Search

Ahimsa...Non-Violence, Yoga, You


"#Ahimsa, rightly understood, is the ultimate weapon; it turns one’s enemy into a friend, thereby banishing the possibility of further conflict. In the practice of yoga, it is important to understand that the same life flows in the veins of all creatures.” – Swami Kriyananda

Patanjali wrote a scripture called the Yoga Sutras, where he outlines yamas (restraints, or what one should not do) and niyamas (observances, or what one should do). Ahimsa is the first of the yamas.


When we talk about the Sutras in Yoga, even the casual practitioner can take something from the teachings. Although written as a Hindu spiritual text, the philosophies have endured for a millennia.


The attitude of the mind has a significant impact on the whole person. If we carry anger, resentment, ill will (you get the picture) it will eat away at us like a disease. Why? Because it is a disease! What we carry within us will eventually come out. It will infect those around us and continue to spread. Guarding our minds is just as important as protecting our physical being.


How do we apply ahimsa to our Yoga practice? Here are a few ideas:

-Try not to set unattainable goals. Challenging yourself to grow and improve is one thing, injuring oneself is another.

-Listen to your body. If the body needs rest, honor that need.

-Don't hold yourself to someone else's standards. Just because one person evolves a posture to something more advanced does not mean you have to. You do not have less of a practice if you don't.

-Be present mentally for the practice.

-Allow for savasana. This link will take you to an article to talk about why savasana is often perceived as the hardest posture/asana.


How do we apply ahimsa to our daily life?

-Cultivate positivity, both inwardly and towards those around you. Our thoughts are powerful. View your thoughts as a garden. Negative thoughts are like weeds, they require nothing of you to grow, but if left to their own, will over take the beautiful fruits of your sacred mental garden.

-Make time to take time for yourself. Self-care practices such as massage, walks, even quality foods and mindful eating.

-Honor your sleep time, this is when the body restores itself. -Practice self-forgiveness, doing your best to avoid returning to the things of your past that have required self-forgiveness. -Give genuine compliments to both yourself and others. -Go on a criticism diet for a week, for a month, or heck, maybe for a lifetime! -Notice the things that create anger in you. Try to identify and avoid them, if it can't be avoided, do your best to learn how to deal with it. When it doesn't work out, remember self-forgiveness.

Stay well my friends.

Namaste,

Kelly





31 views

Published by Rural Yoga Tribe, LLC. Proudly created with Wix.com

The information on our website is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. Please consult a qualified healthcare professional before beginning any exercise program.

By accessing and using this website , you accept and agree to be bound by the terms and provision of this agreement. In addition, when using this websites particular services, you shall be subject to any posted guidelines or rules applicable to such services, which may be posted and modified from time to time. All such guidelines or rules are hereby incorporated by reference into the TOS.

ANY PARTICIPATION IN THIS SITE WILL CONSTITUTE ACCEPTANCE OF THIS AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO ABIDE BY THE ABOVE, PLEASE DO NOT USE THIS SITE.